Trust Events

Illustrated Public Lecture Series

Heritage Trust sponsors monthly illustrated lectures related to heritage buildings. Talks may focus on architectural history, the events and persons associated with a building or place, or other building-related topics such as restoration. Read more to find out what is coming up or call us at 423-4807.
Location:
NS Museum - Auditorium, 1747 Summer Street, Halifax.

Admission:

Free admission and the Public is invited to attend.
Note: NS Museum parking lot is pay by the hour 24 hrs/day. Parking on the street is free in the evening.

 
 

gifPosted gif September 2-14

posterThursday, September 18th, 7:30pm
Museum of Natural History
1747 Summer Street, Halifax

Of Spy Planes and Flying Canoes: The 1921 Air Survey of Halifax in the Wake of the Great War

The lecture is an offshoot from research into the military and civilian history, technological development, and practical outcomes of aerial photography in Canada after the First World War.

An episode of one of the first urban surveys, carried out over parts of the Halifax peninsula in 1921, is highlighted. Using the photos and a re-assembled mosaic as a guide, a variety of features unique to the post-war urban landscape of the city are illustrated and discussed.

Dirk Werle is a geographer and managing partner with Ærde Environmental Research in Halifax. He has worked as a researcher and advisor to Canadian government agencies for almost 30 years, often with focus on the utilization of modern Earth observation satellites. He is a past president and associate fellow of the Canadian Remote Sensing Society and serves on the board of the International Ocean Institute – Canada.


 

gifPosted gif June 13-14

posterThursday, June 19th,
AGM 7:00pm, Lecture 7:45pm
Museum of Natural History
1747 Summer Street, Halifax

W.B. (Bill) Hockey, B. Arch., MEDS(conservation), CAHP

Mr. Hockey received his Bachelor of Architecture in 1970. He has been working in the preservation field since September 1971, when he was hired by Parks Canada to produce measured drawings of Historic Properties, Halifax as part of their commitment to assist with development of the site. He moved to Ottawa in 1974 where he held positions in Heritage Recording and Restoration Architecture. While there he worked on historic sites from coast to coast, as well as sites in Dawson City, Yukon. In 1979 he moved to Calgary to become Head of Restoration Architecture, responsible for projects in Alberta and British Columbia. In Alberta Mr. Hockey was a member of the Alberta Association of Architects and the Alberta Building Envelope Council, (ABEC). He also took responsibilities as Project Manager for projects including Renovation of Big House, Fort Langley, Rehabilitation of the Banff Park Museum, and stabilization of the Gulf of Georgia Cannery in Richmond, B.C. It was through work on these projects plus his involvement with ABEC, that he became interested in both the costs and technical problems related to the continued use of historic buildings as a cost-effective alternative to new construction.

In 1988 Mr. Hockey returned to Halifax as Head Architectural Analysis and Planning for the historic and contemporary buildings portion of the Parks Canada Agency’s Program in Atlantic Canada. He also pursued a Master of Environmental Design Studies (Conservation) Degree, receiving it in 1992. His Thesis evaluated the costs of reuse of historic buildings and how they are incurred, using 54 Canadian Case Studies as the statistical basis for the study. Between August 4, 1993 and October 31, 2001 Mr. Hockey dealt with the ravages of fire for St. Andrew’s Blockhouse, Saint George’s Round Church, Halifax, the Pictou Railway Station, Green Gables House, and St. John’s Anglican Church, Lunenburg, building expertise in a field that he had not intended to work in. Mr. Hockey also provided certification services with the Canadian Heritage Places Incentive Funding Program reviewing projects for compliance with the Standards and Guidelines for the Preservation of Historic Places in Canada. He also served on the national committee that reviewed Conservation Master Specifications for the NMS Secretariat.

Mr. Hockey retired from the Federal Government in December 2006 and currently offers consultant services through his company Architectural Conservation Services based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Through ACS, he has worked with the restoration of historic masonry and maintenance planning, provided FHBRO functional training to Parks Canada Staff, functional guidance for a number of clients, and worked in the lead role for a number of other projects. Review his website: www.archconserve.ca for detailed information regarding this experience. Mr. Hockey is a member of ICOMOS Canada, Heritage Canada, and the Association for Preservation Technology International, (APTI). He is also a Professional member of the Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals www.cahp.ca as a Building Specialist.


 

gifPosted gif May 5-14

posterThursday, May 15th, 7:30pm
Museum of Natural History
1747 Summer Street, Halifax

Allen Penney presents:
The Clifton Estate, Windsor, Nova Scotia

After a superficial description of the context, builders, and design of the landscape and house, and the development through thirteen stages of incremental addition and alteration, Allen Penney will outline the history of the house over its 180-year life.


 

gifPosted gif April 10-14

posterThursday, April 17th, 7:30pm
Museum of Natural History
1747 Summer Street, Halifax

Justin Helm presents:
“Victorian Ornamental Hardware in the Maritimes: 1860-1910”

The presentation will cover all types of decorative hardware such as: doorknobs, backplates, escutcheons, rosettes, mortise locks, flush bolts and door hinges. It will examine the gradual development of hardware and how it evolved to reflect the Victorian appetite for specific ornamental designs.

Justin will discuss a wide variety of hardware from various styles of design ranging from figural motifs to, Anglo-Japanese, Neo-Grec, Egyptian Revival, Moorish Revival and Aesthetic patterns. A large portion of the hardware to be presented can still be found in Maritime homes today.

The materials, finishes and casting accomplishments of various manufacturers’ and how they were specifically designed for both the house and homeowner alike will be featured. A brief synopsis of the hardware restoration process will be included as well as the emergence of hardware as a collector’s item.

The goal of the lecture is to provide individuals with a better understanding of the importance hardware played during the Victorian era and to raise awareness and foster an appreciation for its preservation. Hardware is seldom given a second glance and unfortunately a significant amount of ornamental hardware has ended up in the landfill along with the grand Victorian homes they adorned.

The lecture provides an opportunity to learn how to identify hardware and to gain knowledge of items homeowners may have in their own homes. Justin looks forward to sharing his passion of hardware with others and invites lecture attendees to bring in any hardware to further the discussion following the lecture.

 

gifPosted gif March 11-14

posterThursday, March 20th, 7:30pm
Museum of Natural History
1747 Summer Street, Halifax

Allan Marble presents:
“Destined for Demolition: Hospital Buildings constructed in Nova Scotia, 1867-1950”

During the last six years Allan Marble has been researching the history of hospitals in Nova Scotia, a topic which has been completely overlooked by other historians.

Considering that a large number of Nova Scotians have been born in and have died in hospitals, one would have expected there would be some interest in how hospitals were established and who was responsible for their establishment.

Allan will answer these questions in his presentation and show photographs of several of the hospitals, many of which were the among the most elegant buildings in the towns of Nova Scotia.

 

gifPosted gif February 7-14

posterThursday, February 20th, 7:30pm

Judith Fingard presents:
“Licensed Drinking Establishments in Temperance-Era Halifax”

This talk focuses on the decline of the retail liquor trade as a private enterprise in the city of Halifax between the 1880s and the imposition of prohibition during World War I.

It consists of an examination of regulations promoted by the temperance lobby to undermine the “liquor traffic” and provides a profile of the licensed liquor retailers.

Illustrations include photographs of buildings in which drink was sold and advertisements that vendors inserted in the city directories.

 

gifPosted gif January 10-14

posterThursday, January 16th at 7:30pm

Bruce MacNab Presents:
“In Harry Houdini’s Footsteps: A look back at twenty Nova Scotia structures visited by the Handcuff King”

Bruce MacNab’s illustrated lecture will retrace the steps of Harry Houdini through Nova Scotia and the buildings where the young magician first showcased his extraordinary talents that transformed him from a small-time conjurer to the world's most celebrated escape artist. Houdini’s 1896 Maritime tour venues included prisons, police stations, insane asylums, hotels, stores, theatres and factories.

Bruce is the author of The Metamorphosis: The Apprenticeship of Harry Houdini, published in 2012 and the award winner of the APMA Best Atlantic-Published Book. He was the organizer of the sold-out séance at The Halifax Citadel last Halloween.

Bruce grew up in Dartmouth and attended the Nova Scotia Institute of Technology. He has taught Apprenticeship and Communications at the Nova Scotia Community College. A Red Seal journeyman carpenter, he has worked on Martha's Vineyard, Bermuda, and across Canada. Bruce is restoring his 19th century farmhouse in Williamsdale, Cumberland County and serves on the Advisory Council on Heritage Property.

 

gif Posted gif November 09-13

Saving the Women's & Infant's Home

 

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

 
painting
Location:
Woman's Council House
989 Young Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia

gifPosted gif November 09-13

HTNS Illustrated Public Lecture Series

posterThursday, November 21st, 7:30 pm

John Whidden presents:
The New England Colonial Style: Two Centuries of Georgian Influence on Domestic Architecture in the Wolfville Area.

The Georgian period produced architectural styles which spread all over the world in the 18th and 19th centuries, and which continued to appear throughout the 20th. The talk will consider the essence of Georgian architecture, why it has been so popular for so long, and the ways in which it has been interpreted in one small corner of empire: Wolfville, Nova Scotia..

 

gifPosted gif October 10-13

posterThursday, October 17th, 7:30 pm

The Garrison Orderly Books for the Army Headquarters in Halifax for the War of 1812 are in the collection of the Nova Scotia provincial archives.

The Orderly Books contain entries that allow the researcher to gain a day to day perspective of war in a garrison town during the late Georgian era. Kevin Robins of the Army Museum invites you to join him as he shares some of his findings that illustrate everything from the posting of guards around the city to military justice and supply of garrison, as well as news from abroad and from the battlefields of Upper and Lower Canada. Poster image credit: John Elliott Woolford, View from Citadel Hill, in the collection of the AGNS..

 

gifPosted gif September 12-13

posterThursday, September 19th, 7:30 pm

Top 10 History of Louisbourg: Past, Present, Future. By A.J.B. (John) Johnston

The talk is based on his decades of research and writing about Louisbourg and its 18th-century world. John is the author or co-author of fourteen books; thirteen deal with history and he has one novel so far. Among his most recent books is Louisbourg: Past, Present, Future (Nimbus Publishing). John Johnston was recently made a chevalier of France's Ordre des Palmes académiques in recognition of his body of work. The talk will be very well illustrated. More information on the speaker can be found at AJB Johnston.

 

posterThursday, June 20th,
AGM 7:10 pm. Lecture 8:00 pm

Iris Shea Presents:

Foreign Protestant Descendants at the North West Arm; Boutiliers, Jollimores and Slaunwhites.

Over the past 25 years Iris Shea has researched the history of the communities from Armdale to Pennant. Jollimore, one of those communities, was first called “North West Arm”. The Jollimores were the first permanent settlers to the North West Arm in 1826, followed by their cousins, the Boutiliers and Slaunwhites, all descendants of foreign Protestants. These three families established a thriving community on the western side of the Northwest Arm, working in the local quarries and mills, and building rental cottages on their shoreline property which attracted prominent Halifax residents. Several houses, built well over a century ago, are standing today. Her talk will include images of Jollimore’s past and its people.

Iris spent the first 18 years of her life in Jollimore where her mother’s family settled in 1908. She co-authored Deadman’s: Melville Island and Its Burial Ground with Heather Watts and, with Dr. Joyce Hemlow, published three articles on the Umlahs, Hemlows and McDaniels in the Nova Scotia Historical Review. Since 1999 she has been writing a monthly local history article “Discovering Our Past” in the Chebucto News.

Admission is free

 

posterThursday, May 16th, 7:30 pm

Charles Burke Senior Archeologist of Parks Canada Presents:

"I Often Wonder What Become of Her"
Beryl Markham's Atlantic Crossing Semptember 5th, 1936
Abingdon, England to Baleine, Nova Scotia

Lectures take place at the Museum of Natural History, Summer Street, at 7:30 pm (see details at top of page).

Admission is free

 

posterThursday, March 21st, 7:30 pm

Deborah Trask and Jeffrey Reed will discuss the historic house at Blockhouse Corner, which was moved in June of 2012. The move was documented by a film crew for the HGTV show ‘Massive Moves’, which aired in February 2013. They will talk about the history of the property, its surroundings and the structure.

Deborah Trask spent 30 years on the curatorial staff of the Nova Scotia Museum before her retirement as Curator of Buildings & Operations, at which time the Board of Governors appointed her ‘Curator Emeritus’. Since then she started a museum consulting service and managed the Mahone Bay Settlers Museum for 4 years.
In 2012, she was appointed to the Nova Scotia Advisory Council on Heritage Properties.
A resident of Lunenburg County, she continues to serve as an advisor to the Mahone Bay HAC.

Jeffrey Reed has served as the Coordinator of the Heritage Property Program, and as Standards and Guidelines Officer for the Province, including a period as the Nova Scotia representative on the National Standing Committee, which oversaw the creation of the second edition of the Standards and Guidelines.
In recent years, he has been teaching in the Heritage Carpentry Program at the Lunenburg campus of the Nova Scotia Community College, and is a sessional lecturer at the Dalhousie School of Architecture and Planning, teaching conservation theory and practice.
He continues to consult privately and to contribute workshops and public education opportunities through a variety of local government and community-based venues.

Lectures take place at the Museum of Natural History, Summer Street, at 7:30 pm (see details at top of page).

Admission is free

 

posterThursday, February 21st, 7:30 pm

Acadian Wintertime Celebrations on Candlemas and Mid-Lent by Georges Arsenault The well-known Acadian folklorist and historian Georges Arsenault will give an illustrated talk on two ancient and popular Acadian winter celebrations.

The first is known as Chandeleur (Candlemas) and takes place on February 2. The second, called
Mi-Carême, is celebrated a few weeks later in the middle of Lent.

Georges Arsenault has researched the origins of these joyful traditions and how they were observed in Acadian communities in Eastern Canada. Published by Acorn Press and translated by Sally Ross, the English titles of his two books on these winter festivities are:

- Acadian Traditions on Candlemas Day: Candles, Pancakes, and House Visits

- Acadian Mi-Carême: Masks and Merrymaking

Candlemas Day was at one time an important religious and social festivity. Pancakes were the symbolic food of choice. In many Acadian villages, young men went from door-to-door collecting food either for a communal feast or to give to the poor. To celebrate Mid-Lent, people visited each other's homes dressed up in masks and costumes, as they still do in the Chéticamp region of Cape Breton. In some villages, a scary woman called the Mi-Carême distributed candies to good little children.

In his presentation, Arsenault will trace the evolution of these traditions, highlight modern-day celebrations, and look at the role they still play in Acadian culture.

Historian and folklorist Georges Arsenault was born in Abram's Village, Prince Edward Island and holds a B.A. degree in Political Science from Université de Moncton and a M.A. degree in Folklore from Université Laval. From 1977 to 1982, he was a cultural officer for the St-Thomas Aquinas Society and then became Visiting Professor in Acadian Studies at the University of Prince Edward Island for three years. From 1986 to 2003, he was the host of Radio-Canada's morning radio show for Prince Edward Island. He now works as a freelancer and lives in Charlottetown.

He has been collecting songs and stories for many years and has published extensively on the folklore and history of the Acadians of Prince Edward Island. Among his main publications are:

* The Island Acadians 1720-1980

* Acadians Legends, Folktales, and Songs from Prince Edward Island

* Acadian Christmas Traditions

* Acadian Mi-Carême: Masks and Merrymaking


Admission is free

For more information call 423-4807

 

posterThursday, January 17th, 7:30 pm

Looking Back to Plan Ahead: The geography of the Halifax Peninsula at the end of the 18th century and why it matters today

Mike Reid is the Coordinator for the Coastal Research Network and a recent graduate of the Masters of Marine Management program at Dalhousie University. It has often been said that in order to properly prepare for the future, one must first understand the past. Join Mike Reid as he explains his use of historic maps to develop a picture of how the landscape of the Halifax Peninsula looked at the end of the eighteenth century. Mike will introduce some of the earliest detailed maps of the Halifax Peninsula as well as the cartographers who created them. He will then explore the advantages and pitfalls of using older cartographic data, and show how even two centuries later these historic images, combined with modern GIS technology can be used to inform modern planning and development strategies.


Admission is free

For more information call 423-4807

Past Events 2012

posterThursday, October 18, Gregory MacNeil
"Documentation for the Conservation of Historic Places"


download poster
The Morris Office is one of the buildings that Jerry MacNeil Architects has documented with equipment that delivers high accuracy, three dimensional images of the interior. This exciting technology serves multiple purposes in the conservation process.

Lectures take place at the Museum of Natural History, Summer Street, at 7:30 pm (see details at top of page).

 
posterThursday, November 15, Ian McKee "Trip from Moscow to St. Petersburg, a photo essay by an enthusiastic traveller"

Lectures take place at the Museum of Natural History, Summer Street, at 7:30 pm


(see details at top of page).blan
 
Thursday, September 20,
Jonathan Fowler and Colin Larocque: "Telling Time with Tree Rings: Dendroarchaeological Investigations at the Morris Building"

Interdisciplinary research has recently brought about new discoveries concerning the origins of the Morris Building. It now appears that the Morris Building may be the oldest timber house in Halifax, although it may never have been owned by Charles Morris Sr., the noted (and perhaps controversial) Chief Justice and Chief Surveyor. Additional results raise interesting questions about the origin of the materials used to build the structure. In this illustrated talk, two members of the research team will explain how tree-ring dating works, how archaeologists have benefited from this method, and how its application in this case brought a new perspective to this storied structure.

Jonathan Fowler has conducted archaeological excavations on prehistoric and historic sites in Canada as well as overseas, but his primary area of research has been colonial Nova Scotia/Acadie/Mi'kma'ki. Since 2001 he has directed archaeological excavations at Grand-PrŽ, and when he is not walking ploughed fields looking for pre-Deportation Acadian villages, he can be found teaching Archaeology at Saint Mary's University in Halifax.

After completing his Master's and Ph.D at the University of Victoria, Colin Laroque moved to Mount Allison University in 2003, where he set up the first dendrochronology laboratory in Atlantic Canada. The Mount Allison Dendrochronology Lab (MAD Lab) was formed in January of 2004 and has concentrated its research efforts in the four Atlantic Canadian provinces. Although initially interested in past climates, The MAD Lab has initiated archaeological, geomorphological and ecological investigations all using tree rings and the links to their growing environments contained within their ring patterns.

Lectures take place at the Museum of Natural History, Summer Street, at 7:30 pm (see details at top of page).

Thursday, January 19
Tom Urbaniak
(Political scientist, Cape Breton University)

“Toward a Heritage Charter for Nova Scotia: A Practical Policy Agenda


Conserving heritage places is about much more than “registering” buildings and holding random protests. It’s about good tax policy and smart incentives. It’s about making sure public infrastructure money does more good than harm.  It’s about coordinating heritage objectives with housing, economic development, public health, and other policies and programs. Political scientist Tom Urbaniak will propose a Heritage Charter; it will be an outline for a practical provincial omnibus bill to make it easier to identify, retain, and re-use our sites, districts, and cultural landscapes. The point is to safeguard Nova Scotia’s identity, generate good local jobs, give a boost to struggling communities, and transfer to future generations the tangible products of centuries of accumulated wisdom.
---
Tom Urbaniak, Ph.D., is a political scientist at Cape Breton University in Sydney. He was recently elected to represent Nova Scotia on the Board of Governors of the Heritage Canada Foundation. Part of his work has been at the intersection of heritage conservation, economic development, and housing. Tom’s books include Action, Accommodation, Accountability: Rules of Order for Canadian Organizations and Her Worship: Hazel McCallion and the Development of Mississauga. He is frequent media analyst on public affairs, giving interviews in English and French. Tom serves on the Cape Breton Regional Library Board and the board of Centre communautaire Etoile de l’Acadie. He is a member of the Canadian Polish Research Institute. One of the recent heritage projects for which he provided assistance and leadership is the revitalization of Sydney’s Polish Village Hall, owned by Canada’s oldest Polish community organization. Tom resides in the multicultural community of Whitney Pier, close to the site of the former Sydney steel plant.  

 

Thursday,  February 16
Laura DeBoer
(Urban archaeologist)
"A Tale of Two Buildings: The Archaeology of the Robertson Store and Albro's Brick Warehouse"

Both visitors and locals have come to know the Robertson Building on Lower Water Street as a distinct piece of Halifax’s shipping and ship building heritage thanks to its preservation and the partial reconstruction of its displays as a part of the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. The structure is the result of a union of two separate buildings used for different, but related, purposes. Beginning in the spring of 2011, an archaeological building survey has been conducted in order to generate both a record of the building as it exists in the present, and a reconstruction of the building’s changes over time. This archaeological approach provides focus on the material history of the building, its phases and styles, which in turn delivers insight into those who have used and altered the building since its construction.

Thursday, March 15
Royce Walker
(Chair, McNabs Island Advisory Committee)
What We Have Left Behind: Structures Built on McNabs Island

Late winter is the time to begin thinking about exploring McNabs Island and Royce Walker is our guide to the island lying off Eastern Passage. His topic is “What We Left Behind” and as you will see, this includes a variety of structures. Royce is a member-at-large of the McNabs and Lawlor Islands Provincial Park Advisory Committee and an enthusiastic guide to the hidden history of the island.

Among the indicators of past development are traces of the gardens developed by Frederick Perrin (of the Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce family) on the estate where he summered. His gardens were said to rival Victorian gardens such as the Public Gardens in Halifax.

Lectures take place at the Museum of Natural History, Summer Street, at 7:30 pm. (see details at top of page)

Thursday, April 19
Claire Campbell
(Historian, Dalhousie University)
Reuse, Reinvent, Relocate: How Canadian Cities Manage their Historic Properties

Decisions, and controversies, about urban heritage tends to centre on individual buildings and specific projects: their location, their façade, their silhouette, and sometimes, their meaning. There is often little sense of their situation, especially their relationship to the natural environment in which they were placed. But this relationship is crucial to understanding both the site’s historical significance and its reincarnated form and function.

This talk looks at how the downtown cores of Thunder Bay, Lunenburg, and Winnipeg were rearranged or recreated to accommodate popular ideas about Canada’s history and nature on the one hand, and urban renewal and economic growth on the other.

Lectures take place at the Museum of Natural History, Summer Street, at 7:30 pm. (see details at top of page)

Thursday, May 17
Jeffrey Reed
(Heritage Consultant)
Over the last century the scope of value for heritage sites has moved from single architectural monuments of world importance to the intangible attributes of cultural landscapes. The speaker will examine this development and the implications for deepening and widening of what are now layered and complex understandings of the heritage we have received and which we may choose to protect and hand on to succeeding generations. Hearers will be challenged to consider the degree of cultural complexity which should be represented in the built and cultural environment, identified and protected in our communities: what pages are missing from the ongoing diary of peoples and places.

Lectures take place at the Museum of Natural History, Summer Street, at 7:30 pm. (see details at top of page)

Thursday, June 21, 2012 at 7:10 pm Annual General Meeting and at 8 PM Jim Bremner’s talk about "J.F.W. DesBarres's Castle Frederick."

Located in Falmouth, Hants County, Castle Frederick has been the subject of a number of archaeological investigations over the past two decades and is considered to be an area of archaeological significance in Nova Scotia (including evidence of First Nations and pre- and post-Deportation Acadians). The site is best known for its association with J.F.W. DesBarres (1721-1824), soldier, cartographer-hydrographer, and colonial administrator who lived at Castle Frederick from 1764 until 1774. He controlled thousands of acres of land in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. His estate included a large Manor House and an observatory, perhaps one of the first in North America, built in 1763. Equipped with some of the most advanced astronomical devices of the time, the observatory was important as a location for the calibration of his survey instruments and DesBarres used Castle Frederick as a base of operations for his famous series of coastal maps entitled the Atlantic Neptune. Jim Bremner is a direct descendant of DesBarres and owner of Castle Frederick Farms, located on part of what was once a much larger estate.

Lectures take place at the Museum of Natural History, Summer Street, at 7:30 pm. (see details at top of page)

Please note:

* The June lecture begins at 8 PM, following the Annual General Meeting at 7:10 pm.

2011

Thursday, October 20, 2011at 7:30 pm
"Nothing Happened Over There: Researching Prince's Lodge, Birch Cove and Rockingham."

Our second lecture of the season will be Sharon and Wayne Ingalls' illustrated talk "Nothing Happened Over There: Researching Prince's Lodge, Birch Cove and Rockingham." Sharon and Wayne recently published "Sweet Suburb", a local history that documents the many significant events that took place along the western shore of Bedford Basin. You will learn about the impact of duc d'Anville's fleet on the Mi'kmaq and on the founding of Halifax in 1749. The authors will also speak about a forgotten army camp at Birch Cove for British soldiers defeated in the American War for Independence. In addition, the stories and tales that have grown up around Prince's Lodge will be discussed.

Copies of the book will be available for $35 (cash or cheque).

2011 Winter Lecture Series

Thursday, January 20 at 7:30 pm
Paul Bennett ~ Endangered Schoolhouses: The “Palace Schools” of
Victorian and Edwardian Nova Scotia


Monday, February 21 at 7 pm*
Sara Beanlands ~ The Life and Legacy of the Rev. Dr. Andrew Brown
*Please note: This talk takes place at 7 pm at St. Matthew’s United Church, Barrington Street.

Thursday, 17 March at 7:30 pm      
Graeme Duffus ~ History of Masonry and Architecture:
Stirling, Cobb, and Duffus

Thursday, 21 April at 7:30 pm
Iris Shea ~  The Pool House in Jollimore:
Uncovering the Mystery of this 19th century house, its Original Location and Owners

Thursday, 19 May at 7:30 pm
Conrad Byers ~ The Role of Building Civic Pride through Buildings Thursday, 16 June at 7:10 pm

Annual General Meeting
(Lecture to follow at 8 pm)
Andrew Powter ~ An Illustrated Presentation on the Painted Rooms of
Nova Scotia

 

2010 Fall Lecture Series

Thursday, 16 September at 7:30 pm
Dr. Allan Marble ~ “Would you like to live in these Houses?”

Thursday, 21 October at 7:30 pm
Dr. Ian Cameron ~ “Lawlor’s Island: the Quarantine Story”

Thursday, 18 November (Time and place TBA)
Annual Dinner
Speakers: Elizabeth and Philip Pacey ~
“Travels with Charley’s Office: Keeping a Nova Scotia Landmark”

Thursday, 20 January, 2011 at 7:30 pm
Dr. Paul Bennett ~ “Palace Schoolhouses in Nova Scotia”

Special Lecture and Performance
Saturday, September 11 at 7:30 pm St. John’s Anglican Church, Lunenburg Tickets $15 ($5 students at the door).
A Celebration of Music in Historic Churches
Gordon Callon, Adjunct Professor of History and Musicology at Acadia University will lecture on English Theatre Songs from Robert Johnson to Henry Purcell followed by music by Byrd, Johnson, Wilson, Wm Lawes, Purcell, and Draghi

17 June, 2010. 8:00 PM (FOLLOWING the AGM which begins at 7:10 PM)
Speaker: Marilyn Gurney
Topic:   “The King’s Yard”

20 May, 2010, 7:30 PM
Speaker: Brian Robinson
Topic:  “History of Fortified Towns - Halifax’s Fortified Heritage"

15 April, 2010, 7:30 PM
Speaker: Garry Shutlak
Topic: David Stirling’s Houses

18 March, 2010
Speaker: Father Maurice LeBlanc
Topic: “Acadian Painting in Acadie”

Fr. LeBlanc will discuss the evolution of painting by Acadians, beginning at the end of the 19th century, up to the establishment of a Department of Fine Arts at l‚Université de Moncton in 1963. Father LeBlanc is a graduate of l‚Université Sainte-Anne and Gregorian University, Rome. A retired professor of Art History and Artistic Director, he lives in West Pubnico, where he enjoys painting and choral music. The talk is one in a series of free public lectures held by Heritage Trust of NS. Everyone is welcome.

18 February, 2010
Speaker: Arthur Irwin
Topic: “A Chapel with a Wonderful Personality” St. Margaret’s Anglican Church in Laurie Park

Energy Consultant and CBC Radio Noon expert Arthur Irwin will speak about St. Margaret's Church in Oakfield at the Nova Scotia Museum on Summer Street at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 18.
St. Margaret’s of Scotland Church was built by an Englishman, Lieutenant General John Wimburn Laurie. He arrived in Canada in 1861. In 1865 he purchased 800 acres in Oakfield and established one of our earliest communities. He brought twenty families from England. This beautiful structure was built from the pine logs on the estate for the family and servants, modelled after the Old English tradition. The chapel was one of the first buildings to be erected which was followed by a school, post office, stable, sawmill, stage coach inn, railway siding and two quarries. Three generations of Lauries are buried behind the Chapel.
In October, 1999, Arthur Irwin was asked by the Anglican Diocese of Nova Scotia, to assist in the planning process to make the building more energy efficient. Mr. Irwin has dealt with several hundred historic structures throughout his career but this example of a wonderful “Historic Gem” had a special significance and presented a number of interesting challenges as he upgraded the energy efficiency of this unique structure.
The original oil lamps are still hanging from the high ceilings, a leather bound bible on the lectern inscribed “Oakfield Church 1868”. A beautiful stained glass window behind the Altar remains intact.
"Simplicity, warmth and a quiet elegance produced from the surrounding stately pines caught my attention," says Mr. Irwin. "I visualized an imaginary sign stating, 'Do not disturb' hung across the dark stained interior wainscoting which reminded me to prevent any signs of man made footprints.”
All of the exterior walls have been upgraded, insulated, windows replaced and a new heating system installed. The “Chapel In The Pines” will hopefully stand for another 130 years, respecting our forefathers contribution to our heritage !
The meeting is open to the public, free of charge and is sponsored by the Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia. Light refreshments will be served.

Presentation of Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia Built Heritage Awards

Date: February 15, 2010
Time: 3:00 – 5:00 PM (Presentations begin – 3:30 pm, Reception to follow)
Location : Halifax City Hall (Halifax Hall) Argyle St. Halifax ...more

21 January, 2010
Speaker: Peter McGuigan talk about "The early history of St. Mary's University (1802-1952)"
at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, January 21, in the auditorium of the Nova
Scotia Museum, 1747 Summer Street, in Halifax.
The evening is sponsored by the
Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia.
The public are invited to attend.


Past Events 2009

Thursday, June 18th, 2009
Annual General Meeting at 7:10 pm
Guest Speaker: Jonathon Fowler
Interpreting Acadian Houses in the Pre-Deportation Period

Thursday, May 21st, 2009
Struggle to Open, Struggle to Survive: St. Mary's College 1802-1952)
Peter McGuigan

 

Workshops

TBA

 

Walking Tours

TBA

 

Open Houses

TBA